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Newport water quality achieves “Superior” rating


CROSBY – The Newport Subdivision has traveled a mighty hard road to achieve good water but now the drinking water can be called superior, according to the state regulator agency.

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) designated the public water system operated by Newport Municipal Utility District as a Superior Public Water System on April 8.

Texas water supply systems are regulated by (TCEQ) with supervisory jurisdiction. The new designation for Newport means the subdivision’s water exceeds minimum acceptable standards for the state.

Newport M.U.D. is a political subdivision governed by a five-member board of directors elected by residents. Sources inside the Newport MUD Board say that Newport is now one of very few Municipal Utility Districts east off the San Jacinto River to meet this standard. State statistics show less than 13 % of community water systems in Texas have achieved superior ranking, and only 58 systems in Harris County have been so designated.

“A superior water system must meet and maintain a higher set of standards than the minimum rules that apply to community water systems,” says James Pope of the Public Drinking Water Section of the TCEQ.

Richard Swanson, President of the Board of Directors, said, “Through the endeavors of our operating staff, the Newport MUD was able to achieve the highly esteemed water system rating of ‘Superior.’ It will take the commitment of the staff and the Board of Directors to maintain this rating in the coming years.”

Newport MUD is operated by Professional Utility Services, Inc.

“Newport MUD provides water service to approximately 2400 homes, multifamily units, and businesses in the Newport subdivision near Crosby.” writes Lori Aylett, attorney for Newport MUD, “A superior water system must continually meet or exceed the enhanced standards to remain a superior system.’’

Since 1936, state agencies have recognized outstanding water supply. The program was codified by state law since 1945. To be rated superior, a system must be inspected and evaluated by TCEQ personnel as to physical facilities, appearance and operation.