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Posts published in “Day: October 11, 2007”

The end is a beginning

As new columnists, we would like to use this first opportunity to introduce ourselves to you and let you know a little bit about who we are and where we are.

For us, one summer has ended, but another is just beginning. As the leaves transform from green to gold, we too are changing. At 22, we are no longer in the spring of our lives, when everything is beautiful and new. Now things are heating up, making us sweat, working up our thirst. This is not like the season of play we used to anticipate so eagerly. This is our transition into the so-called Real World.

Even though we have been best friends for the past 8 years, we find ourselves entering this new phase in very different ways. One is back in Texas, where we were born and raised; the other moved 1,100 miles away to Ohio. How did we get to these places? Summer brought us here.

* * *

Kristan

On May 21st, I carried the last cardboard box from my dorm room to my car. With a mixture of reluctance and excitement, I closed the trunk, settled in behind the wheel, and pulled away from campus. Looking in the rearview mirror, what did I see? A beautiful university, an exciting city, and four of the best years of my life. And when I looked ahead? The great unknown.

Well, not completely unknown. From a map, I learned that “Cincinasty” sits in the bottom left corner of Ohio. From my boyfriend, who graduated and moved there a year before me, I learned that the city serves as corporate headquarters to Procter & Gamble, the company that gives us Crest, Charmin, Tide, and every other consumer product we need to survive. From the United States Post Office, I learned that it’s spelled C-I-N-C-I-N-N-A-T-I, not C-I-N-C-I-N-A-T-T-I. Oops.

So, Cincinnati, OH is home to Steven Spielberg, Ken Griffey Jr., Nick Lachey, and now, me. I was fortunate enough to get a job offer just two days before graduation, so it was bye bye summer, hello 9-to-5. I jumped straight into my new city and my new career, making me wonder, whatever happened to baby steps?

But I guess that’s the point: I’m not a baby anymore. Not even a kid. I’m an adult, more or less, and this is how it goes. Work, eat, pay bills, sleep. Repeat.

To tell you the truth, it’s really not that bad. There are things I miss, like my family and friends, but I sincerely enjoy my work, I have a roof over my head, and the weather here is great! Truly I am very grateful for all of that.

But there’s something missing. Though I am doing a lot of things for myself — reading for leisure, practicing piano, playing sports — I feel less personally fulfilled than I did in college. As a Resident Assistant and student leader, I practically had meaning thrown at me. I assisted my fellow undergrads almost 24 hours a day, arranging study groups, volunteering sessions, or trips to the emergency room. While I don’t necessarily want to be on-call all the time again, I do want to feel like I’m contributing to my community in some larger way.

In school, it’s so easy. Every day, we are given purpose and value. Through education, through leadership, through personal interactions. But out here, in the Real World, we lose a lot of that. We struggle, because suddenly we are in a void. We cannot find meaning. We have to make it.

So that’s what I’m doing now. Working and writing, yes. Exploring a new city and taking new steps in my relationship, yes. But most of all, I am trying to make meaning in my life, with my life. Because that’s what really matters to me.

* * *

To be continued…

Kristan Hoffman and Angie Liang have been friends since middle school. Kristan is the daughter of newspaper publisher Gilbert Hoffman, and both she and Angie worked for the paper during summers. Currently Angie is a graduate student in advertising at the University of Texas in Austin, and Kristan works at a graphic design firm in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Kristan and Angie would love to hear from you! Email JBUcolumn@gmail.com.

Neathery named 50th Miss Highlands

By BOBBY HORN JR.
HIGHLANDS—Despite an early morning rainstorm that cancelled the parade, the 51st Annual Highlands Jamboree turned out to be a success with thousands of people coming out to Highlands Elementary on Saturday afternoon for the festivities.
There was good fun for all Saturday, with games and prizes for the youngsters, live entertainment, historical displays and food, food, food.
Inside the school, visitors were able to meet local business representatives and browse through the silent auction area.
Junior Miss Highlands
Just down the street friends and family battled limited parking areas and large mud holes to attend the 15th Annual Junior Miss Highlands and 50th Annual Miss Highlands Pageants. The Highlands Horizons community service organization hosts the pageants each year.
With the new Highlands Junior School opening in the Fall of 2008, this would be the last pageant in the old auditorium.
Held in the afternoon, the Junior Miss Pageant began with the opening number choreographed by Amanda Twiggs. The contestants performed a dance routine to Elvis Presley’s “All Shook Up.”
Contestants are judged in three areas: sportswear presentation, party dress presentation and interview. There is also an optional talent competition.

While sportswear and party dress involve poise and modeling the interview portion is the one which brings out the contestant’s ability to think on their feet. The girls have no prior knowledge of the question to be asked and as one is being asked, the others are segregated so that they cannot hear the answer. This year’s question, which dealt with what age a girl should be allowed to date and why, brought a variety of answers ranging from 13 to 16, with most saying that maturity was a deciding factor.
When the winners were announced four special awards were first given. Madison Gibson won both the Talent Award as well as High Ticket Sales. This year’s Junior Miss Congeniality, Lexi Edwards, also won the Miss Photogenic Award.
In the final judges’ tally, second runner up went to Faith Drews. Gibson won first runner up.
Tears began to flow when Emilee Traylor, the first runner-up in the 2006 pageant, was named 2007 Junior Miss Highlands.
Miss Highlands
The final event of Jamboree was the Miss Highlands Pageant. Recalling the last half -century of pageants, the girls opened the program with a routine to a montage of songs from each decade. The choreographer was Jamie Lumpkin.
Began as the Jamboree Queen Pageant in 1956, the pageant has been held every year except 1957. To honor those who have worn the crown, the pageant directors showed a video retrospective with photos from each year’s pageant.
The competition for the Miss Highlands is the same categories as the Junior Miss with one exception. The older girls are given a more age-appropriate question. This year’s question posed the scenario that the girl would be featured on the front page of the New York Times in 10 years. “What,” they were asked, “would the story be about?”
This year’s senior talent winner was Haylee Bogie. Jennifer Valentine was voted Miss Congeniality. Each year the pageant honors one contestant for her community service with the Jennie Robbins Service Award. This year’s recipient was Courtney Briscoe. She was a co-recipient last year.
Kayla Neathery won both the Photogenic award and High Ticket Sales.
This year’s second runner up was Crystal Bradford. Candace Smith won first runner up.
The crowd erupted in cheer as Kayla Neathery won the 2007 Miss Highlands title.

San Jacinto River waste pit named a cleanup priority

HIGHLANDS— The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has placed the San Jacinto River Waste Pits on a shortlist of potential Superfund sites.
The waste pits, located near the I-10 bridge over the San Jacinto River, are contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, commonly called dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans, commonly called furans.
Wildlife in the area, including fish, has become contaminated with the pollutants, which can cause cancer and other health problems in humans.
Despite posted warnings, some area residents continue to use contaminated parts of the river as a food source.
The warning, posted in 1990, cautioned against eating catfish and blue crab taken from the river. The state’s heath department says children under 12 and women who are nursing or are pregnant should not eat this seafood.
“This is a major step toward really getting the river cleaned up,” Rep. Gene Green (D-Texas) said. “I’ve been working with the EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to get to this point when the source of the dioxin was discovered.”
The pollution emanates from paper mill waste pits in which dioxins formed during bleaching process were dumped in the 1960s and 1970s which are now abandoned.
Scientists knew for many years that pollution levels in the San Jacinto River were high, but they didn’t know why until recently when they discovered the pits.
In March 2007, Green and Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas) asked the EPA to designate the waste pits a Superfund site, and in July the State of Texas added its name to the request.
“The San Jacinto River has been a part life for folks in that area long before the Texas Revolution,” Poe said. “Cleaning it up for future generations must take a top priority. I am very pleased that the EPA has recognized the need to do so and I will continue to work closely with Congressman Green to see that we do everything possible to get the federal assistance needed to clean it up.”
The Superfund designation would normally provide federal money to help clean up pollutants if the responsible parties aren’t found or are insolvent. However, because appropriations for Superfund projects have dwindled in recent years, Green may have to make a special request in order to fund a cleanup of the site.

Drugs suspected in Highlands slaying

By LEWIS SPEARMAN
HIGHLANDS – Residents of the Hunter’s R.V. Park were distrubed by the sounds of gunshots in their community on Wednesday, October 3 before 3:15 in the morning.
Officially deputies report, “Sheriff’s patrol units responded to a discharge of firearms call in the 600 block of S. Main, Highlands, Texas.  When units arrived, residents of an RV park directed units to a deceased white male in the driveway of the park.”
The deceased was identified as Kevin Ferguson; when last seen he was walking from a nearby trailer home in an adjacent RV park with an unknown man.
Two suspects were described as having been with the victim at one point.
Harris County Homicide Detective conducted an investigation into the incident and charges are pending against Deandre Ledat Johnson. Detective Sgt. Dennis Field indicates Johnson met with Ferguson concerning a conflict related to illicit drugs. The conflict evidently escaladed and Ferguson was fatally shot. Ferguson died at the scene. His father was contacted concerning the death.

Cobles open Kawasaki dealership in Humble

By LEWIS SPEARMAN
HUMBLE – One of the largest volume dealers in North America for the world’s fastest factory motorsports products is expanding to Humble; bringing value, low prices, innovative engineering acquired through years of racing experience and first class service.
The Coble family already has the number one volume dealer in North America selling Kawasaki, Snapper and Massey Ferguson products at Highlands Tractor Kawasaki, located on Main Street at Wallisville Road in Highlands. That location is known through out the state, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Louisiana. The success of that store (founded by R.C. Coble) is partially due to being able to purchase your product at excellent terms and prices, getting it serviced correctly the first time and being able to buy a trailer to haul it away on at the same location.
The new location, off the frontage road a quarter mile before FM 1960 from Highway 59 North, 19322 US 59 North, was designed for visibility, accessibility, convenience, enjoyment of customers and the people working there. Elements that made the original store a success are brought to a thriving crossroads.
What motivates a successful storeowner to take the risk and expense of opening a new location?
“Humble is a great community, bottom line – it is growing for a better tomorrow and we were excited to become a part of it. Humble and northeast Houston deserve their own Kawasaki dealership.,” said Mrs. Casey Coble the newest addition to the Coble family and the best looking in general opinion.

Keith Coble, who started as a mechanic at his father’s original location responds, “Well, Highlands is my roots but I’ve always wanted to have a stand alone motorsports dealership on the freeway. Knowing about the northeast Houston community’s focus on improvement, I just couldn’t help myself. Besides having been a Kawasaki dealer for fifteen years, I have never seen as much demand as I have now. They decide a couple of years ago to compete against themselves for better and better products.”
The challenges of opening a new location in what was a 12, 000 square foot store and converting it into a model showroom for motorcycles, jet skis, all terrain vehicles, and the Kawasaki developed, Mules were extensive. Casey Coble implemented the technological, business organization and paper structure – adding aesthetics as needed to the now attractive interior. The couple decided to hold their personal lives behind the development of the new store, it means sacrificing days off and working incredible hours per week. Keith coordinated the establishment of air-conditioned showroom, service and mechanics department, a fully stocked parts department, extending the lighting and re-surfacing the storefront. Years of experience in getting the product ready for the customer lent improvements in the ergonomics of getting the product quickly into service so the product can be in the customer’s hands faster.
Kawasaki boasts dirt bike of the year, superbike of the year, the new trans utility vehicle, the uniquely powerful 250 horsepower jet ski according to market comparison publications. Everyone in the store (including 2003 Street Bike Drag Racing National Champion, Jeff Peck,) will tell you that research and development is the keystone of the Kawasaki brand, developing two new motorcycle models each year.
Casey explains, “Kawasaki is dominating the product market right now. That is the prime motivator for us to come out here and put it all on the line. They are throwing superbike of the year in the trashcan and replacing it. What did they get with that? Superbike of the year – again, and that isn’t yet good enough so they go back to the drawing board to make it even better. It’s a philosophy for market domination.”
The new store has a complete line of new Kawasaki Motorsports products available and parts in stock. Generally, the best inventory available would be at a new location.
“We’ve got a line of motorcycles we can get out for $3500 to $3600 up to real nice cruiser bikes for $7300 to $7400 with drag bars, custom wheels that come right from the manufacturer that way. I have the 2053 c.c. Vulcan, the biggest, baddest cruiser there is loaded – saddlebags, windshield running boards and chrome everywhere for about $14,500 where everybody expects to pay $18,000 for similar models. I’m putting out the quality, dependability and speed that Kawasaki is known for throughout the world.” says Keith.
Hunters can find all terrain and Mules built for their needs here. Keith Coble has several Boone and Crocket racks on record and has designed vehicles from hunting weekend after weekend in the field to maximize their potential in rugged terrain.
“My Trans 4 is the ultimate hunting machine in my opinion, I would like to invite Houston area hunters to come out and see it for themselves,” Keith adds. “I use mine for everything, why would you go out and bang up a $50,000 diesel truck when you can get everything you need done in a machine designed to take it and is quiet. I don’t care how tough the pulling gets even on sharp rocks; it is a vehicle we use all year long. We do landscaping we work horses. It is versatile.”
Keith is partners with Highlands Motorcross Park so his customers can have a challenging track on which to practice and race and has raced since he was 17 years old. He follows the professional motorcross circuit and can detail the engineering developments to produce the KX 250.
He adds, “It isn’t just speed that will get you across the finish line it takes reliability and dependability. The reason Mr. Stuart dominated the motorcross track this season goes back to the research and development done by Kawasaki. They have the engineers that not only do motorsports, the also make heavy equipment. I am sponsoring six dragracers now including Gilbert Coronado, we had a  X 14 here that sold the second day we put in on display. Every spec on that bike was learned at the racetrack.”

Sterling -White begins beautifying cemetery

By LEWIS SPEARMAN
HIGHLANDS – Perceived changes involving memorials to loved ones that have passed on are sensitive matters.
Sterling-White Chapel Cemetery representatives talked with the Star-Courier about improvements they are undertaking and clear-up any misunderstandings.
Carriage Services owns the cemetery and plans to continue to do so “as long as the land is here,” according to Managing Partner, Mathew Forastiere. There has been no change in ownership since the Krizaks sold the cemetery many years ago.
Mathew Forastiere and Debbie Starnes, Family Service Manager, are most excited about the future of Sterling–White Cemetery. Two new sections are planned for the Northern end of the cemetery with the most modern of amenities for hedged family estates in lots of twelve, eight or four spaces made available. Specially designed with irrigation, drainage and walkways to start at the roadway and extend North to that end of the property, the family lots will be privately hedged and professionally developed. Plans are currently being submitted and one example will be built on a consignment basis for families to view. Once completed these sections are to take up eight cemetery lots.

Although there is space still available at the extant cemetery’s mausoleum, another chapel style mausoleum is being planned by the cemetery’s developer in part of the (as yet undeveloped) back of the cemetery property. The cemetery’s property continues on back to the San Jacinto River but development currently stops less than 200 yards from existing roadways on the West. There is plenty of room to grow.
A clean up process has begun for the cemetery. It is motivated by safety concerns, beautification aspirations and to properly irrigate the landscape. For example, all of the currently exposed water spigots will, upon completion, be buried then removable high power sprinklers will enable a consistent lawn maintenance watering schedule.
Given that individuals wish to express their feelings with addendum to gardens for their loved ones, many have placed items on grave sites to show their unique grieving. According to Forastiere however, “After nine months of being here, actually putting on a pair of jeans and working in the cemetery, I am finding it is impossible to maintain the cemetery safely and securely with loose and easily broken items being placed around the beautiful marble monuments. When we cut grass with high powered equipment, there is no telling where loose items can be thrown.”
The areas had rains for three months just about solidly, the cemetery is recovering from that period by maintenance.
Once the clean up is accomplished the bell tower, one of the distinguishing features of the cemetery, is to be refurbished.
“I’ve gone back and researched what the cemetery has done in the past in an effort to regulate the gardens that you see around many of these headstones. They had folks come in and submit plans as to what they wanted to do and the cemetery might approve it,” said Forastiere, “Now in their attempt to regulate it sometimes things have gotten out of hand and detract from the natural beauty of the cemetery.”
“The safety of my staff and everyone who visits here is my first concern and then the beauty of the cemetery. I have here a perpetual care cemetery– which means I am required to maintain the grounds and the roadways, loose and easily broken items impedes that goal. When someone purchases property in the cemetery they are buying the right to bury their loved one in that property. When someone puts in an unapproved item they are in violation of the rules and regulations of the cemetery. The rules and regulations of the cemetery are available to them and have been since 1967, when we became perpetual care.”
Forastiere invites those that have questions about what is approved for the cemetery to speak with him or Debbie Starnes about any issues, or to receive the cemetery’s rules and regulations. Flowers are welcome in cemetery approved vases and saddles over the monuments. Sterling White Chapel Cemetery phone number is (281) 426-3555.
Forastiere is from a family that maintains a 104 year old business in western Massachusetts that partnered with Carriage Services in 1998 while he was Funeral Director. He moved to Texas 5 years ago to become Regional Consultant. He moved to Crosby soon after marrying Janna a year ago and has been blessed with a daughter, Sloan.

The end is the beginning…

As new columnists, we would like to use this first opportunity to introduce ourselves to you and let you know a little bit about who we are and where we are.
For us, one summer has ended, but another is just beginning. As the leaves transform from green to gold, we too are changing. At 22, we are no longer in the spring of our lives, when everything is beautiful and new. Now things are heating up, making us sweat, working up our thirst. This is not like the season of play we used to anticipate so eagerly. This is our transition into the so-called Real World.
Even though we have been best friends for the past 8 years, we find ourselves entering this new phase in very different ways. One is back in Texas, where we were born and raised; the other moved 1,100 miles away to Ohio. How did we get to these places? Summer brought us here.

* * *
Kristan
On May 21st, I carried the last cardboard box from my dorm room to my car. With a mixture of reluctance and excitement, I closed the trunk, settled in behind the wheel, and pulled away from campus. Looking in the rearview mirror, what did I see? A beautiful university, an exciting city, and four of the best years of my life. And when I looked ahead? The great unknown.
Well, not completely unknown. From a map, I learned that “Cincinasty” sits in the bottom left corner of Ohio. From my boyfriend, who graduated and moved there a year before me, I learned that the city serves as corporate headquarters to Procter & Gamble, the company that gives us Crest, Charmin, Tide, and every other consumer product we need to survive. From the United States Post Office, I learned that it’s spelled C-I-N-C-I-N-N-A-T-I, not C-I-N-C-I-N-A-T-T-I. Oops.
So, Cincinnati, OH is home to Steven Spielberg, Ken Griffey Jr., Nick Lachey, and now, me. I was fortunate enough to get a job offer just two days before graduation, so it was bye bye summer, hello 9-to-5. I jumped straight into my new city and my new career, making me wonder, whatever happened to baby steps?
But I guess that’s the point: I’m not a baby anymore. Not even a kid. I’m an adult, more or less, and this is how it goes. Work, eat, pay bills, sleep. Repeat.
To tell you the truth, it’s really not that bad. There are things I miss, like my family and friends, but I sincerely enjoy my work, I have a roof over my head, and the weather here is great! Truly I am very grateful for all of that.
But there’s something missing. Though I am doing a lot of things for myself—reading for leisure, practicing piano, playing sports—I feel less personally fulfilled than I did in college. As a Resident Assistant and student leader, I practically had meaning thrown at me. I assisted my fellow undergrads almost 24 hours a day, arranging study groups, volunteering sessions, or trips to the emergency room. While I don’t necessarily want to be on-call all the time again, I do want to feel like I’m contributing to my community in some larger way.
In school, it’s so easy. Every day, we are given purpose and value. Through education, through leadership, through personal interactions. But out here, in the Real World, we lose a lot of that. We struggle, because suddenly we are in a void. We cannot find meaning. We have to make it.
So that’s what I’m doing now. Working and writing, yes. Exploring a new city and taking new steps in my relationship, yes. But most of all, I am trying to make meaning in my life, with my life. Because that’s what really matters to me.
* *
To be continued…
Kristan Hoffman and Angie Liang have been friends since middle school. Kristan is the daughter of newspaper publisher Gilbert Hoffman, and both she and Angie worked for the paper during summers. Currently Angie is a graduate student in advertising at the University of Texas in Austin, and Kristan works at a graphic design firm in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Kristan and Angie would love to hear from you! Email JBUcolumn@gmail.com.

You eat what you got

While making the purchase of a rutabaga today at the supermarket; the cashier at the store asked what it was and said she’d never seen one much less tasted one. Not many folks eat rutabagas but they are served on occasion at the little house on Goose Creek.
A rutabaga is considered a food of famine and that means “what you eat when you are poor or there ‘bouts”. Probably on the same level as turnips and sugar beets if you eat such.
Shortly after me and the Mrs. eloped 38 years ago, yours truly got mad at work and gave notice. They took it and we went on a famine food diet for several months near as I can relate.
We dined on bologna sandwiches, tomato sandwiches, banana sandwiches, Vienna sausage sandwiches, Spam sandwiches and tuna sandwiches with lots of pork and beans.
You eat what you got and get on with it or at least that the way I was brought up.

We still eat most of the sandwiches mentioned, but the Mrs. will bluntly refuse a Spam and Vienna sausages because we ate so much of it.
But that’s all right; we have a new generation because our granddaughter likes Vienna sausages.
Reckon by having eaten such a variety of and enjoyed the famine foods it has caused me to have mixed taste. Back when we had the cabin @ Day Lake, me and the Four Dog would have turnip greens and ribeyes for supper and breakfast if any was leftover.
A can of tomatoes cut up with crushed saltines make a cheap, quick meal and mighty tasty. Four Dog likes mustard on his fold over Spam sandwich with onion. Guess it depends on how your taste buds work.
Back when I was a chap in Georgia, my taste buds were in order, or at least I thought they were. There were numerous items I would not eat nor drink while growing up.
My folks had a restaurant back then with their main product being fried catfish, fried potatoes, fried hush puppies, Cole slaw, and sweet tea.
Did not know what a shrimp was at that time nor would I eat it until I was in my 30’s. To this day it still reminds me of bait. I’d take a slice of fried fatback any day over the bait. Some people call fatback: streak-Olean, Tennessee Bacon, salt pork and it is what pork rinds are made from.
My grandparents milked their own cow and yours truly ventured to the stall each morning when Ma Pearl went to pull the cow’s teat. I would not drink that sweet milk, rich as it was. They went to all the trouble to pour the milk in a container from the store for me to drink it.
It simply was not good with all that yucky stuff (cream) floating in top of the glass. That’s why we buy fat free or 2% milk to this day.
Wonder where the granddaughter gets all her pickiness from when she puts her feet under our table?
You hear the one about the snake needing glasses? The snake went to the doctor telling him his vision is not what it was and he can’t see well. The doctor checked his eyes then fitted the snake with a pair of glasses and asked that he is to return in two weeks.
The snake came back in two weeks most depressed. The doctor asked if the glasses were any help.
The snake says they helped alright, said he found out he’s been living with a water hose for two years.

Match financial goals with the right investments

Over the course of your life, you’ll almost certainly have many different financial goals – and to help achieve them, you’ll need to use many different investments.
How might you target specific investments for specific goals? Here are a few suggestions:
*Saving for a home – When saving for a down payment on their first house, many people set up an account exclusively for that purpose, keeping the money separate from other investment accounts. To save for a home, you might want to use certificates of deposit (CDs) or short-term, investment-grade bonds, both of which can help preserve your principal.

*Saving for retirement -To enjoy a long and comfortable retirement, you’ll need to build a substantial amount of financial resources. And you’ll help yourself if you can accumulate those savings in tax-advantaged vehicles. If your employer offers a 401(k) or similar retirement plan, take full advantage of it. Your contributions are generally made with pre-tax dollars, so the more you put in, the lower your annual taxable income. Plus, your earnings can potentially grow on a tax-deferred basis, which means your money may accumulate faster than it would if placed in an investment on which you paid taxes every year. And your 401(k) or other plan may have a dozen or more investment options.
Even if you have a 401(k) or other employer-sponsored plan, you can usually contribute to an IRA as well. A traditional IRA offers tax-deferred earnings, while a Roth IRA can potentially grow tax-free, provided you don’t begin taking withdrawals until you’re 59 – 1/2 and you’ve had your account at least five years. And you can fund an IRA with virtually any type of investment – stocks, bonds, CDs, etc.
*Saving for college – You can save for college with a Coverdell Education Savings Account or a Section 529 savings plan, both of which can provide tax-free earnings, as long as the money is used for higher education expenses. (Your earnings will be taxable if you use withdrawals for other purposes.) And if you invest in your own state’s Section 529 plan, your contributions may be tax deductible. However, Section 529 plan distributions could reduce your child’s ability to qualify for financial aid. Another possibility to consider is a zero-coupon bond, typically issued by the Treasury under the name of STRIPS. You buy a zero-coupon bond at a deep discount; when the bond matures (which, if you’ve planned carefully, will occur when your child is ready to enter college), you collect the full face value. However, you may have to pay taxes on each year’s interest payments, even though you don’t actually receive them until the bond matures.
*Generating income during retirement – You could spend two or three decades in retirement, so you’ll need a consistent income stream, which you may be able to receive from investment-grade bonds. But to fight the effects of inflation, you’ll also need the potential for rising income, which you may be able to receive from dividend-producing stocks. (Keep in mind, though, that even stocks that have consistently paid dividends can decrease or eliminate them at any time without notice.)
Of course, these investments are certainly not the only ones available to you. But they do help point out the importance of identifying your various goals – and choosing the right investments to help meet them.