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Posts published in “News Index – Barbers Hill Dayton PRESS”

Chambers County to offer economic assistance for food, rent, and more

Chambers County Indigent Healthcare is now accepting applications from Chambers County residents who wish to participate in the Brazos Valley Community Action Program (BVCAP).

This is a first come, first served program that provides assistance for food, utility, rent and mortgage payments. It is open to residents whose income level does not exceed 125 percent of poverty level. Specific household size to monthly income ratios are provided in the attachments.

Applications are accepted by appointment only. Please call Chambers County Indigent Healthcare at 409-267- 2770 to schedule your visit.

Beginning September 7, Chambers County Indigent Healthcare will begin accepting applications from Chambers County Residents who wish to participate in the Brazos Valley Community Action Program (BVCAP).

BVCAP is a first come, first served program that provides assistance for food, utility, rent and mortgage payments.

Personal Responsibility urged as Positive COVID-19 Cases Increase in County

As the number of COVID-19 cases increases, Chambers County Judge Jimmy Sylvia, Chambers County Local Health Authority Dr. William Clay Brown, Chambers County Public Health Director Mary Beth Bess and Chambers County Emergency Services Director Ron Nichols urgently appeal to Chambers County residents to take personal responsibility for their own health and actions and take steps to slow the spread of COVID-19 in their communities.

The COVID-19 Pandemic is wreaking havoc on the local, regional and state healthcare system, restricting the level of and speed at which emergent care can be delivered. As of the issuance of this statement, the Chambers County EMS call volume has increased 73 percent over this time last year and 67 percent of calls are to either COVID-19 positive or suspected positive patients.

Many regional hospitals have declared Internal Disasters or are unable to take patients due to lack of available beds or staff. Patients are spending an average of 96 hours in the Emergency Room before they are moved to a bed. Many are being treated in hallways and medics are being left with patients who are waiting to be admitted so that ambulances are able to return to service.

BH Eagles capture state baseball title!

 

BARBERS HILL EAGLES Boy’s Baseball Team, and Girl’s Softball team, show their Victories celebrations as they both win state championships this month.

MONT BELVIEU — The Barbers Hill High School baseball team won its first ever state championship in school history Saturday afternoon in Round Rock in a tight game against Hallisville High School.

The Barbers Hill Eagles took an early lead in the bottom of the first with a single from Brodey Williams. Fast forward to the sixth inning and that’s when the Eagles took the lead for good on a sacrifice fly by Josh Campbell.

The final score was 2-1.

The baseball team now joins the Barbers Hill softball team as state champions. The softball team beat Aledo High School 4-1 in Austin last week.

Chambers County libraries re-open May 4

New Juanita Hargraves Memorial Branch Library in Winnie opens on May 3

CHAMBERS COUNTY, TEXAS – The Chambers County Library System will be entering the month of May 2021 with a bang as they hold the grand opening of the new Juanita Hargraves Memorial Branch Library on May 3 and reopen all other branch locations at 100 percent beginning May 4.

“This is a great day for Chambers County,” said Chambers County Judge Jimmy Sylvia. “The Chambers County Library System is an integral part of our communities and we are excited to open not only a new branch location, but also reopen 100 percent to the public.”

Baytown Mayor Receives Vaccine at Houston Methodist Baytown

BAYTOWN — (April 1, 2021) — Taking advantage of the state’s decision to make the COVID-19 vaccine available to all Texans age 16 and over, Baytown Mayor Brandon Capetillo received his first dose of the vaccine on March 31.

The Texas Department of State Health Services opened registration for the vaccine to all Texans 16 and older on March 29, while still asking providers to prioritize appointments for people 80 and older. Capetillo said he is happy to do his part to help bring the COVID-19 pandemic to an end.

“The sooner our citizens are vaccinated the quicker we will be able to return to our normal routines,” Capetillo said. “I encourage everyone who can to register to be vaccinated.”

To date, nearly 10 million Texans have received a dose of the vaccine since it was made available in December 2020. Houston Methodist serves as a state-designated vaccine hub and has administered over 483,210 vaccines. Houston Methodist Baytown Hospital’s vaccine center has administered thousands of doses to Baytown area residents.

Middleton against Taxpayer supported lobbying

OPINION, by Mayes Middleton

Last month, the Chambers County Commissioners Court voted 4-1 in favor of a resolution opposing the ban on taxpayer-funded lobbying (HB 749). In a time when Texans in Chambers County are suffering in the wake of a worst winter storm in a generation, the Commissioners Court decided a main priority for the county was taking more of your tax money to give to insider Austin lobbyists.

Committee report recommends keeping Robert E. Lee High School name

The committee recommended leaving the Robert E. Lee name on the high school.

BAYTOWN – A 42-person advisory committee charged with recommending name changes for Goose Creek CISD schools, has issued their final report. The result was a recommendation to keep all the school names, but transfer one name, Green Center, from an existing facility to a new school under construction.

The committee was formed last year, after a public debate over the removal of Confederate names on buildings and public facilities all over the nation. The issue surfaced in a GC CISD board meeting, and evoked much discussion over the ensuing weeks. The initial public sentiment seemed split on changing the name of Baytown’s oldest high school, Robert E. Lee HS.

The advisory committee ended up not only dealing with the name on Lee high school, but advocating a whole new district-wide policy for naming buildings. The committee recommended that facilities be named after geographic areas, landmarks or physical attributes, or the instructional focus of the school. The report also said naming should include the principal’s legacy, and be sensitive to the diverse community they serve.

Catastrophic Winter Storm Power Disruptions

By Mayes Middleton

Millions of Texans were without power for days, with lives lost and many more put at risk. The words anger and frustration do not do justice to what we are experiencing. Over the last several days, I have been working with CenterPoint, Entergy, and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to improve our power situation in Galveston and Chambers Counties.

There are two major failures. First, ERCOT has clearly failed. Our state’s electrical grid operator has shown unparalleled incompetence during this critical time and Texans are paying the price. The “R” in “ERCOT” is for “reliability” and that did not happen.

Second, CenterPoint energy’s rolling blackouts were not made in a fair “pro-rata” manner. Instead, Galveston and Chambers Counties have disproportionately suffered. Centerpoint is in control of which areas are turned on and which aren’t. Overall, Galveston County was 88% out and the west side of Chambers County was 76% out, while Harris County was just 16% out at times. Some communities were hit even worse, Galveston and San Leon/Bacliff approached 100% outages. Centerpoint said 1.2 million of their 2.5 million customers were out and that only essential circuits were left on, so the question remains why are so many homes in Harris County on essential circuits and so few in our area?

BARBERS HILL HIGH SCHOOL: Racist sign throws school into controversy

MONT BELVIEU – Kids write the ‘darndest’ things on campus walls especially after a series of contentions and uncertainty locally and nationally has drawn taunt racial relations.

Barbers Hill High School had some graffiti painted on the wall that read “Black Lives Don’t Matter,” and some other incidental forms of protest are spoken of as happening not long after the November 3 election. Some parents want something done.

Fresh on the mind of many locals is the controversy of dreadlocks in Barbers Hill after each attending students had signed off on accepting the dress code to attend but two students were determined by the Superintendent to be in violation due to the length of their dreadlocks. The district suspended the two students. The issue went viral.