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Posts tagged as “Jack Morman”

YEAR IN REVIEW 2018

Compiled from the files of the STAR COURIER

JANUARY

Judge Don Coffey files for re-election. New Highlands Fire Station opens. Gene Green’s vacant Congressional seat attracts 7 Democrats and 4 Republicans for the March 6 Primary Election. Josh McKinney is found dead on Mizell Street in Highlands, date Yvonne Ramirez charged. Nate Scott is the Highlands VFD Firefighter of the Year. New Highlands/Lynchburg Chamber board announced, Jim Wadzinski is president. Crosby Fire Department names Warren Thompson as Firefighter of the Year. Crosby ISD Superintendent Keith Moore resigns. Court papers reveal that the PRPs have been funding Superfund opposition citizens’ groups.

FEBRUARY

Rotary Chili Feast is held Feb. 3rd. Steve & Linda Miller win the car in the Raffle. Bras for the Cause raises a record $200,000 plus for Cancer. Pct. 2 Commissioner Morman speaks at the North Channel Chamber. Crosby ISD hires interim superintendent, Kirk Lewis. Don Coffey wins the Terry Davis Award from the Highlands/Lynchburg Chamber. Crosby/Huffman Chamber holds its annual awards ceremony. TxDOT holds public meetings on I-10E improvements.

MARCH

Houston Rodeo Trail Rides start. Worker killed in local tire shredder plant Genan. County Attorney Vince Ryan sues Opioid manufacturers. Crosby Sports Association opens their Little League season. Primary Election Results: Lucia Bates defeats Don Coffey; Sylvia Garcia wins Democratic race for Congress. Pct. 2 Opens Juan Seguin Park at the South Lynchburg Ferry landing. Goose Creek ISD proposes 2 bond referendums totaling $437 Million. 3 Country singers appear at the Crosby RocknC Round-up. Big Car Show is held at RocknC Round-up.Grand Parkway Section H, US59 to Hwy. 146, starts construction. Governor authorizes $3 Million for flood mitigation study. Highlands Little League Queens are Lily Phillips, Kendra Earls, and Kamryn Schuelsky.

Mid-term Election results in change of principals involved in Superfund site

The November 6th Mid-term election brought about a number of changes in our elected officials, and some of these are involved in promoting or maintaining progress on the Superfund San Jacinto River Waste Pits.

Three U.S. Congressmen have been involved in getting the site on the Superfund role, and now two of them have been replaced. Gene Green has retired, and his seat was won by Sylvia Garcia. Ted Poe has also retired, and Dan Crenshaw was elected to fill his seat. Brian Babin remains in office. These three Congressmen have repeatedly prodded the EPA to put the site on the “Priority List” for remedial action, and to continue to monitor progress.

The Superfund site is in Harris County Precinct 2, which will have a new Commissioner in January. Adrian Garcia will hold the position and replace Jack Morman. Morman has been vocal in supporting the clean-up and removal of the toxic wastes at the site, which have the potential to pollute the river and Galveston Bay.

The County Judge is now Ed Emmett, but will be replaced in January by Lina Hidalgo. The county received $10 million dollars from the lawsuit against the Responsible Parties, and has administered that money along guidelines from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Election results: Emmett, Morman defeated in upset


Winners include Sylvia Garcia; Ted Cruz; Lina Hidalgo; Adrian Garcia

HARRIS COUNTY – With 100% of the results counted, political experts are declaring winners in Tuesday’s election.

In the national Senate race, incumbent Ted Cruz had a strong statewide win, defeating popular Beto O’Rourke by 51% to 48%. However, Beto carried Harris County with 58% of the local vote. Other statewide results included Governor Greg Abbott winning 56% of the vote against Lupe Valdez; and AG Ken Paxton receiving 51%.

Harris County’s straight ticket voting showed 44% Republican, and 55% Democratic. This might explain two major upsets: County Judge Ed Emmett, the popular incumbent, was defeated by Democrat challenger Lina Hidalgo who received 49.62% of the vote, to Emmett’s 48.32%, with a third candidate, Libertarian Eric Gatlin receiving 2% of the vote. About 5000 votes separated the top two candidates, but Gatlin received 24,085 enough to swing the election to either of the other two contenders.

Republican County Commissioner Pct. 2 Jack Morman was defeated by Democrat and former Sheriff Adrian Garcia, who had 50.11% of the vote, versus Morman’s 49.89%. The difference was a mere 490 votes.

History was made in Congressional District 29, where the first Hispanic woman from Texas won a seat in Congress. Sylvia Garcia, formerly a Texas State Senator and Harris County Commissioner, received 75% of the vote against her Republican challenger, Phillip Aronoff.

Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee was returned to office in District 18, with 75% of the vote, versus her opponent Ava Reynero Pate with 21% votes.

In Congressional District 2, formerly held by Congressman Ted Poe, Dan Crenshaw received 53% of the vote, and Todd Litton 45%.

Early Voting now thru November 2

HARRIS COUNTY – Voters can start to begin to cast their votes starting this Monday, October 22. This mid-term election is considered by most political observers to be an important statement about the current Republican control of the White House, Congress, and the Texas government.

Although the president is not on the ballot this time, many important seats in Congress and Texas will be decided. In addition, a number of local Harris County positions are on the ballot, and an important choice in the city of Houston regarding pay for firemen.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 6, but Early Voting will start on Monday, October 22 and continue through Friday, November 2. Hours that the polls are open are as follows:

Oct. 22-26 8 am – 4:30 pm

Oct. 27 7 am – 7 pm

Oct. 28 1 pm – 6 pm

Oct. 29-Nov 2 7 am – 7pm

The election for U. S. Senate has probably gained the most attention, both in Texas and nationally, Incumbent Senator Ted Cruz has seen a strong challenge from Democratic candidate Beto O’Rourke, who has raised much more money than Cruz in his campaign, and seems to have an enthusiastic grass roots support among the public. A visit last Monday by President Trump on behalf of Cruz is thought to boost his chances for re-election.

A number of U. S. Representatives seats are open for election, including District 2, formerly held by Ted Poe, who retired. Candidates in this district include Dan Crenshaw and Todd Litton; District 6, with incumbent Kevin Brady vs. Steven David; District 18 with incumbent Sheila Jackson Lee vs. Ava Reynero Pate; and District 29, where long term Representative Gene Green has retired, and State Senator Sylvia Garcia is running against Phillip Aronoff.

Governor Abbott is defending his seat against challenger Lupe Valdez, and Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick is running against challenger Mike Collier. Another state race that has gathered attention is Attorney General, where the beleaguered incumbent Ken Paxton is running against Democratic challenger Justin Nelson.

In state Senate races, in District 7 incumbent Paul Bettencourt vs. David Romero; and District 15, Randy Orr is challenging incumbent Democrat John Whitmire.

A number of State Representatives are running unopposed, and therefore will be re-elected. These include Brisco Cain in District 128; Armando Walle in District 140; Senfronia Thompson in 141; and Ana Hernandez in 143.

Morman has fun, magic in Crosby

Precinct 2 Commissioner Jack Morman with Crosby Community Center Director Michelle Thompson. He sponsored a Fall Fish Fry Luncheon last Friday, with a magician, live entertainment and special recognition of local first responders including Crosby VFD and Precinct 3 Constable Deputies.The Commissioner said of the packed house, “I am glad everyone could join us.”

Cedar Bayou to benefit from Flood bonds

Pct. 2 Commissioner Jack Morman talks with Luce Bayou and Cedar Bayou watershed residents at the I.T.May Community Center last Thursday.

HUFFMAN – Thursday, July 19, at the I.T. May Community Center, a public meeting was held to discuss the $2.5 Billion bond proposed by the Harris County Commissioner’s Court to sponsor comprehensive flood relief programs by the Harris County Flood Control District.

The measures are to initiate a comprehensive flood control program that begins in the north of the district all the way to the sea. The meetings focus on the needs of local populations and interact with the neighborhoods through a series of meetings. The H.C. Flood Control District presented 14 proposed anti-flood projects to be paid for by the bond.

Cedar Bayou has been flooding for decades now and a study of the watershed has been completed.

In the HCFCD proposal the upstream Cedar Bayou Project would receive $74M from the bond for right of way acquisition, design and construction of channel conveyance improvements and stormwater detention basin upstream of FM 1960. This 1% floodplain could be reduced in size from about 1,500 acres to less than 100 acres.

Another upstream project on Cedar Bayou would cost $11M but almost entirely eliminate the flood risk along upper Cedar Bayou.

Morman backs bond

Precinct 2 Commissioner Jack Morman talks with Crosby flood victims Viola Stubbs and Mildred Bebee concerning options for their property on the Cedar Bayou Watershed. The Commissioner expressed many plans based on the recently completed study of the waterway and indicated that another meeting may be planned for the Cedar Bayou Watershed.

CROSBY – Monday, at the Crosby Community Center Harris County Flood Control District and varied parts of Harris County Commissioner’s Court Precinct 2 came together with interested local residents to hear about the proposed bond to deal with flooding issues.

A $2.5 billion dollar bond is proposed by the Commissioner’s Court and this meeting was to help convince locals that their is a need in the Jackson Bayou vicinity, that is to get some flood control measures and addressed the down stream of the San Jacinto River Watershed.

The bond election is to be held August 25 – the one year anniversary of Hurricane Harvey’s landfall. Early voting is to begin August 8th. It is to address Harris County’s most prevalent natural disaster. The total need in the county for flood risk reduction is about $25 billion, the bond is to enable the H.C. Flood Control District to leverage the federal Harvey-related disaster funding that is on its way to Harris County. The cost to taxpayers would be spread over 10 to 15 years for an estimated 2-3 cents per $100 valuation. An over-65 or disabled exemption and a home worth $200,000 or less would not pay any additional taxes.

“In addition to the watershed that we are meeting on today, the Jackson Bayou Watershed, this is an interconnective system. The water flow upstream will impact in a positive way those folks that flood downstream. This is the most important election in my lifetime, it will be the most we can do to combat flooding for generations to come.” said Precinct 2 Commissioner Morman.

EPA Holds Community meeting in Highlands

RETIRING PROJECT MANAGER GARY MILLER received an award from the San Jacinto River Coalition for his efforts to clean the river.

Waste Pits update; questions and comments answered

The federal EPA agency came to Highlands last Tuesday night, to keep open the communication with the community as promised by their director, Scott Pruitt. The last time this agency, responsible for the Superfund Site in the San Jacinto River, met with the public was last December.

There were no major revelations or changes from information that had been issued previously. Project managers Gary Miller, and Gary Baumgarten presented slides that were essentially the history of the waste pits and the efforts by EPA to clean them up.

On hand for the meeting were a number of officials, including Pct. 2 commissioner Jack Morman, and County Attorney Vince Ryan. Morman spoke to the crowd of about 100 persons, promising to continue a dialogue with the community, and testing of water quality.

EPA project manager Gary Miller revealed that he is retiring in 4 months, but will hand over the project to Gary Baumgarten, who was present. He was asked to give a summary of his experience, and he said he had been with EPA for 30 years, and since 1992 had primarily worked on cleaning up Superfund Sites.

Janetta Coats of the EPA said that they were working on a revised Community Involvement Plan, and local residents would be asked to participate with comments, questions, and information. She said that the EPA is committed to dialogue and collaboration with community members, and urged anyone that wanted included to contact her or sign a sheet at the meeting. Contact Coats at coats.janetta @epa.gov, or 1-800-533-3508.

In his presentation, Gary Miller said that the EPA had reached a settlement with the PRP or Potentially Responsible Parties in April 2018, for the completion of a Remedial Design. He indicated that the EPA, the TCEQ, the Corps of Engineers, and the PRPs are meeting to outline the technical requirements of the design. They are also preparing a work plan to perform sampling and geotechnical investigations in support of the design. He noted that on-site testing and sampling was actually taking place this week.

Morman reviews progress in Pct. 2

Pct. 2 Commissioner Jack Morman at the Crosby/Huffman luncheon.

Mobility and Flooding are the major issues

CROSBY – Pct. 2 County Commissioner Jack Morman spoke to the Crosby/Huffman Chamber at their monthly meeting, last Thursday, May 17th at the Stonebridge County Club. Morman reviewed all the achievements and plans for his precinct, including roads, bridges, and flooding. But he emphasized, “My top priority is flood control, flood prevention and flood protection.”

He noted that the unprecedented and historic storm dropped 50” of rain in 4 days, leading to the countywide flooding. He said that 800 or more homes were affected in the Crosby and Huffman areas.

Harris County is at work to alleviate future flooding and property damage, he said. The county is changing and updating Flood Plain regulations, with new rules about the height of buildings above the 500 year flood levels, and more accurate flood plain maps. Unfortunately he said that inside Harris County are 15 municipalities that set there own rules, and don’t have to follow the county regulations.

However, to deal correctly with the flood problem, the county is now engaged in a buy-out program. They have set the budget for this at $40 million, but the first phase has released $20 million. Many of the homes are in the lower San Jacinto River and Highlands areas, he said. Harris County Flood Control has also asked the state for an addition $240 million to accelerate the home buyout program.

The major effort to deal with flooding would come after the approval of a $2.5 billion bond issue, which the county will put up for vote on August 25th. Actually, Morman said the amount is being calculated now, and may be more or less that that figure, depending upon what is in the “package.” The county would use the money for channel widening, de-siltation projects, and construction of more detention basins. The date of the bond election, August 25, is symbolic because that is the one-year anniversary of when Hurricane Harvey stuck the area.