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Cody’s fundraiser Goes BIG

Dan Huberty welcomes the accolades for HB 76, the Cody Bill and HB 3, the school bill. His staff is weepy and he is supported by Carol Alvarado at left.

CROSBY – August 17, the Big Event for the Cody Stephens GBOGH Memorial Fund was a rousing success held at Southern Lace Estates for a night of big band, big auction and big celebration.

A catfish dinner started off a packed program beginning with recognizing this year’s youngsters saved from sudden death by the efforts of the foundation. Awards for those that contributed effort generally in the form of belt buckles.

It was especially a celebration of the passage of House Bill 76, the Cody Bill — also excitement at the passage of House Bill #3 for education — with special recognition of Representative Dan Huberty, R. 127, Rep. Briscoe Cain, R. 128, and State Senator Carol Alvarado, all instrumental in passing the bill that gives parents the right to choose a heart screening for their students.

Cody Stephens, Scott Stephens son, died in 2012 from sudden death. In the last legislative session, the Cody Bill was signed into law by the governor.

The band Modulation, brought back memories, playing larger band sounds, including those from the 70’s band Chicago. Before the event, the goal was to raise about $275,000, but the event went all the way to “a smidgen under $300,000,” according to Scott Stephens.

“The event set wonderful records. The live auction brought in near $85,000 for 43 items. The silent auction brought in over $12,000. These resources will help us screen young hearts all over Texas and place ECG modules throughout Texas where they are needed.”

Sudden death is the #1 killer of student athletes, about 1 in 300 youths have an undetected heart condition that puts them at risk. The standard physical exam/history misses 96% of the youth at risk. Thanks to the generous donors supporting the mission, Cody Stephens Foundation can offer funding for first year screening. Thus far the foundation has screened more than 130,000 people and at least 100 young lives are referred to more extensive care to avoid sudden death. The ECGs are read by board certified Cardiologists.